Taken 17-May-11
Visitors 9


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Photo Info

Dimensions4500 x 2997
Original file size38.7 MB
Image typeTIFF
Color spaceAdobe RGB (1998)
Date taken17-May-11 08:44
Date modified5-Jan-16 08:43
Shooting Conditions

Focal length24 mm
Max lens aperturef/3.5
Exposure1/30 at f/11
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 100
Metering modePattern
Saguaro Sky Bloom. HDR

Saguaro Sky Bloom. HDR

The night blooming white and yellow flowers appear April through June and the sweet, ruby-colored fruit matures by late June. Saguaro flowers are self incompatible thus require cross pollination. Large quantities of pollen are required for complete pollination as there are numerous ovules. A well-pollinated fruit will contain several thousand tiny seeds.
The major pollinators are bats, primarily the lesser long-nosed bat, feeding on the nectar from the night-blooming flowers, which often remain open in the morning. There are a number of floral characteristics geared toward bat pollination: nocturnal opening of the flowers, nocturnal maturation of pollen, very rich nectar, position high above the ground, durable blooms that can withstand a bat's weight, and fragrance emitted at night. One additional evidence is that the amino acids in the pollen appear to help sustain lactation in bats. The flowers remain open into the daylight hours and continue to produce nectar after sunrise. Doves and bees appear to be the primary daytime pollinators.